Your question: Where do the chromosomes move during metaphase?

During metaphase, the cell’s chromosomes align themselves in the middle of the cell through a type of cellular “tug of war.” The chromosomes, which have been replicated and remain joined at a central point called the centromere, are called sister chromatids.

Where did the chromosomes move in anaphase?

Anaphase consists of at least two distinct processes, traditionally referred to as “anaphase A” and “anaphase B”. Anaphase A is the movement of chromosomes toward the spindle poles via shortening of the connecting fibers; it is the focus of this chapter (Figure 1).

Where do the chromosomes move to in anaphase and why are they moving there?

During anaphase A, the chromosomes move to the poles and kinetochore fiber microtubules shorten; during anaphase B, the spindle poles move apart as interpolar microtubules elongate and slide past one another. Many cells undergo both anaphase A and B motions, but, in some cases, one or the other motion dominates.

What are the stages of M phase?

Panel 18-1. The Principal Stages of M Phase (Mitosis and Cytokinesis) in an Animal Cell. The five stages of mitosis—prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase—occur in strict sequential order, while cytokinesis begins in anaphase and continues through telophase.

What happens during metaphase?

During metaphase, the cell’s chromosomes align themselves in the middle of the cell through a type of cellular “tug of war.” The chromosomes, which have been replicated and remain joined at a central point called the centromere, are called sister chromatids.

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Why is it called anaphase?

Anaphase is a stage in cell division that happens towards the end of mitosis. During anaphase, chromosomes move away from each other. … Anaphase was first coined in German, from the Greek ana-, “back.”

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