Which of the following correctly describes how meiosis I and meiosis II differ quizlet?

The daughter cells each contain four chromosomes after meiosis I and four chromosomes after meiosis II. Which of the following correctly describes how meiosis I and meiosis II differ? … Meiosis I produce diploid daughter cells, while meiosis II produces haploid daughter cells.

Which of the following correctly describes how meiosis 1 and meiosis 2 differ?

Explanation: Meiosis is a way sex cells (gametes) divide. … In meiosis I, homologous chromosomes separate, while in meiosis II, sister chromatids separate. Meiosis II produces 4 haploid daughter cells, whereas meiosis I produces 2 diploid daughter cells.

How do meiosis I and meiosis II differ quizlet?

Meiosis I is a reduction division where only one member of a homologous pair enters each daughter cell which becomes halploid. Meiosis II only splits up sister chromatids.

How do telophase I and telophase II differ during meiosis in animal cells?

How do telophase I and telophase II differ during meiosis in animal cells? Cells remain diploid at the end of telophase I, but are haploid at the end of telophase II. Daughter cells form a cell plate to divide during telophase I, but divide by cytokinesis during telophase II.

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What is a major difference between meiosis II and mitosis quizlet?

half the number of chromosomes and one-fourth the amount of DNA. Homologous chromosomes of a pair are separated from each other. What is a major difference between meiosis II and mitosis in a diploid animal? Meiosis II occurs in a haploid cell, while mitosis occurs in diploid cells.

What happens during meiosis I and meiosis II quizlet?

In meiosis I, homologous chromosomes separate resulting in a reduction of ploidy. Each daughter cell has only 1 set of chromosomes. Meiosis II, splits the sister chromatids apart.

How are mitosis and meiosis similar and different?

Mitosis has only one round of cell division, while meiosis has two. … Mitosis produces daughter cells (diploid cells) that are identical to the parent cell, while mitosis produces haploid/monoploid cells that only have half of the normal number of chromosomes.

What events occur during meiosis I and meiosis II?

In meiosis I, homologous chromosomes separate, whereas in meiosis II, sister chromatids separate. Meiosis II produces four haploid girl cells, whereas meiosis I produces a pair of diploid female offspring cells. Genetic recombination or crossing overonly happens in meiosis I.

How do meiosis I and meiosis II contribute to genetic variation?

Because the duplicated chromatids remain joined during meiosis I, each daughter cell receives only one chromosome of each homologous pair. … By shuffling the genetic deck in this way, the gametes resulting from meiosis II have new combinations of maternal and paternal chromosomes, increasing genetic diversity.

Which two stages differ the most between meiosis I and meiosis II?

Which TWO stages differ the most between meiosis I and II? Prophase and anaphase (Prophase 1 includes steps that are absent in prophase II, and anaphase 1 involves the separation of homologous chromosomes while anaphase II involves the separation of sister chromatids.)

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What structure is most important in forming the Tetrads quizlet?

Prophase I of meiosis forms the tetrads. They line up at the midway point between the two poles of the cell to form the metaphase plate. There is equal chance of a microtubule fiber to encounter a maternally or a paternally inherited chromosome.

Which best describes the end result of meiosis quizlet?

Which best describes the end result of meiosis? An animal’s somatic cells contain 2n chromosomes. … Meiosis makes it possible for a zygote to have the correct number of chromosomes.

Which process is most important for producing haploid cells?

Meiosis is the nuclear division that forms haploid cells from diploid cells, and it employs many of the same cellular mechanisms as mitosis.

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