What is meant by Hardy Weinberg equilibrium?

The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium is a principle stating that the genetic variation in a population will remain constant from one generation to the next in the absence of disturbing factors. … For instance, mutations disrupt the equilibrium of allele frequencies by introducing new alleles into a population.

What are the 4 conditions of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium?

The conditions to maintain the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium are: no mutation, no gene flow, large population size, random mating, and no natural selection. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium can be disrupted by deviations from any of its five main underlying conditions.

Why do we use Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium?

Importance: The Hardy-Weinberg model enables us to compare a population’s actual genetic structure over time with the genetic structure we would expect if the population were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (i.e., not evolving).

How do you know if it’s in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium?

To know if a population is in Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium scientists have to observe at least two generations. If the allele frequencies are the same for both generations then the population is in Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium.

What are the two equations for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium?

Since p = 1 – q and q is known, it is possible to calculate p as well. Knowing p and q, it is a simple matter to plug these values into the Hardy-Weinberg equation (p² + 2pq + q² = 1). This then provides the predicted frequencies of all three genotypes for the selected trait within the population.

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What do PQ p2 2pq and q2 represent?

p2 +2pq + q2 = 1 Where p2 represents the frequency of the homozygous dominant genotype, q2 represents the frequency of the recessive genotype and 2pq is the frequency of the heterozygous genotype.

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