Question: Why do chromosomes become visible during prophase?

During prophase, the complex of DNA and proteins contained in the nucleus, known as chromatin, condenses. The chromatin coils and becomes increasingly compact, resulting in the formation of visible chromosomes.

Why do chromosomes become visible during mitosis?

Chromosomes are not visible in the cell’s nucleus—not even under a microscope—when the cell is not dividing. However, the DNA that makes up chromosomes becomes more tightly packed during cell division and is then visible under a microscope.

Why do chromosomes become visible?

Figure 1: Chromatin condensation changes during the cell cycle. During interphase (1), chromatin is in its least condensed state and appears loosely distributed throughout the nucleus. Chromatin condensation begins during prophase (2) and chromosomes become visible.

Why are chromosomes visible during prophase but not interphase?

No , chromosomes are not visible during the Interphase of cell cycle bcoz of more water content in the nucleus. As water content is more in the nucleus . they appear as fine thread like structures called chromatin , which condenses ( Loose water ) to form compact structures called chromosomes.

What makes the chromosomes become visible during prophase quizlet?

In prophase stage of mitosis, the chromosomes start to condense and become visible as two chromatids, joined by a centromere. … The chromosomes condense and become visible as two chromatids joined by a centromere. Centrioles appear at opposite sides of the nucleus and the spindle apparatus starts to form.

THIS IS INTERESTING:  Are muscle cells produced by mitosis or meiosis?

What is it called when chromosomes appear?

prophase. a cell division begins, the chromatin threads coil and shorten so that visible bar like bodies (chromosomes) appear.

Is chromosome visible in interphase?

During interphase, individual chromosomes are not visible, and the chromatin appears diffuse and unorganized.

What is the function of prophase 1?

Prophase I highlights the exchange of DNA between homologous chromosomes via a process called homologous recombination and the crossover at chiasma(ta) between non-sister chromatids. Thus, this stage is important to increase genetic variation.

All about hereditary diseases