Question: How do chromosomes and spindle fibers move during each phase of mitosis?

In metaphase, chromosomes are lined up and each sister chromatid is attached to a spindle fiber. In anaphase, sister chromatids (now called chromosomes) are pulled toward opposite poles. In telophase, chromosomes arrive at opposite poles, and nuclear envelope material surrounds each set of chromosomes.

What happens if spindle fibers don’t form?

For herbicides with this mode of action, the prophase sequence is normal, but without the spindle apparatus, chromosomes are unable to move into the metaphase configuration and daughter chromosomes cannot migrate to their respective poles.

How do spindle fibers work?

The spindle fibers are microtubules, long strands of protein that move to each side of the cell. They extend out microtubules that are used to pull the chromosomes (condensed DNA pairs) apart and to each side of the cell, allowing the two daughter cells to be completely identical.

What event determines when a chromatid becomes a chromosome?

During anaphase, the sister chromatids at the equatorial plane are split apart at the centromere. Each chromatid, now called a chromosome, is pulled rapidly toward the centrosome to which its microtubule was attached.

What can happen if cells do not duplicate correctly?

Answer: If the cell has not properly copied its chromosomes, an enzyme called cyclin dependent kinase, or CDK, will not activate the cyclin, and the cell cycle will not proceed to the next phase. The cell will undergo cell death.

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What happens in each phase of mitosis?

1) Prophase: chromatin into chromosomes, the nuclear envelope break down, chromosomes attach to spindle fibres by their centromeres 2) Metaphase: chromosomes line up along the metaphase plate (centre of the cell) 3) Anaphase: sister chromatids are pulled to opposite poles of the cell 4) Telophase: nuclear envelope …

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