Where do chromosomes attach?

They attach at a point called the kinetochore, which is a disk or protein that is on each side of the centromere. The spindle fibers will move the chromosomes until they are lined up at the spindle equator.

Do spindles attach to chromosomes?

During mitosis, the spindle fibers are called the mitotic spindle. … Long protein fibers called microtubules extend from the centrioles in all possible directions, forming what is called a spindle. Some of the microtubules attach the poles to the chromosomes by connecting to protein complexes called kinetochores.

What are chromosomes attached to?

The duplicated chromosomes then attach to the spindle, align at the cell equator, and move apart as the spindle microtubules retreat toward opposite poles of the cell. Each set of chromosomes is then surrounded by a nuclear membrane, and the parent cell splits into two complete daughter cells.

What attaches the chromosome to the spindle fiber during metaphase?

During metaphase, spindle fibers attach to the centromere of each pair of sister chromatids (see Figure below). The sister chromatids line up at the equator, or center, of the cell. This is also known as the metaphase plate.

What can happen if cells do not duplicate correctly?

The cell cycle controls the four major phases of cell growth and division. … If the cell has not properly copied its chromosomes, an enzyme called cyclin dependent kinase, or CDK, will not activate the cyclin, and the cell cycle will not proceed to the next phase. The cell will undergo cell death.

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What three phases are individual chromosomes no longer visible?

It is during interphase, telophase, and cytokinesis that the chromosomes are no longer visible.

What happens if spindle fibers don’t form?

For herbicides with this mode of action, the prophase sequence is normal, but without the spindle apparatus, chromosomes are unable to move into the metaphase configuration and daughter chromosomes cannot migrate to their respective poles.

What do 2 haploid daughter cells form?

Meiosis I results in two haploid (N) daughter cells, each with half the number of chromosomes as the original cell. The chromosomes (sister chromatids) line up in a similar way to the metaphase stage of mitosis along the equator. The sister chromatids separate and move toward opposite ends of the cell.

How many chromosomes are in each phase?

In total, there are 46 individual chromosomes (23 x 2) in each somatic cell; they are diploid. During S phase, each chromosome is replicated. This produces a second copy of each chromosome from the mother and a second copy of each chromosome from the father. These identical copies are known as sister chromatids.

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