What happens to two chromatids as a result of mitotic division?

The process in which the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell divides is called mitosis. During mitosis, the two sister chromatids that make up each chromosome separate from each other and move to opposite poles of the cell.

What is the end result of mitotic cell division?

Mitosis ends with telophase, or the stage at which the chromosomes reach the poles. … Telophase is followed by cytokinesis, or the division of the cytoplasm into two daughter cells. The daughter cells that result from this process have identical genetic compositions.

What happens to chromatids after mitosis?

Metaphase leads to anaphase, during which each chromosome’s sister chromatids separate and move to opposite poles of the cell. Enzymatic breakdown of cohesin — which linked the sister chromatids together during prophase — causes this separation to occur.

What happens because of a mitotic cell division?

Mitosis is a process of nuclear division in eukaryotic cells that occurs when a parent cell divides to produce two identical daughter cells. During cell division, mitosis refers specifically to the separation of the duplicated genetic material carried in the nucleus.

What happens to DNA in each stage of mitosis?

This process involves replication of the cell’s chromosomes, segregation of the copied DNA, and splitting of the parent cell’s cytoplasm. … The outcome of binary fission is two new cells that are identical to the original cell.

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What happens during each stage of mitosis?

1) Prophase: chromatin into chromosomes, the nuclear envelope break down, chromosomes attach to spindle fibres by their centromeres 2) Metaphase: chromosomes line up along the metaphase plate (centre of the cell) 3) Anaphase: sister chromatids are pulled to opposite poles of the cell 4) Telophase: nuclear envelope …

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