Frequent question: How does Down syndrome affect life expectancy?

The life expectancy of people with Down syndrome increased dramatically between 1960 and 2007. In 1960, on average, persons with Down syndrome lived to be about 10 years old. In 2007, on average, persons with Down syndrome lived to be about 47 years old.

Can Down syndrome cause early death?

Results: People with Down syndrome died about 28 years younger than the general population. Congenital heart anomalies, comorbidities, low birthweight, and Black and minority ethnicity influenced earlier age of death, as did younger maternal age and poorer parental education.

How does Down syndrome affect your life?

Kids with Down syndrome usually have trouble learning and are slower to learn how to talk and take care of themselves. But despite their challenges, kids with Down syndrome can go to regular schools, make friends, enjoy life, and get jobs when they’re older.

Does Down syndrome get worse with age?

Adults with Down syndrome experience “accelerated aging,” meaning they will age faster than the general population. It is expected that adults with Down syndrome will show physical, medical, and cognitive signs of aging much earlier than what is expected for their age.

Can a Down syndrome child look normal?

Some of the children with Mosaic Down syndrome that we know do not actually look as if they have Down syndrome – the usual physical features are not obvious. This raises some important and difficult social issues and identity issues for both parents and children, which parents have discussed with us.

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What gender is Down syndrome most common in?

Down syndrome appears to be more common among boys than girls, the study indicates. The condition is also seen more frequently in Hispanic children at birth, though the number of these children appears to level off with that of white children as they age. Black children appear less likely to have Down syndrome.

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